Marietta Georgia Moving Company

Movers in Marietta Ga

With 33 years of moving company experience, Mark the Mover is south of Marietta Georgia down Old Atlanta Road to Marietta Blvd and Carrol Drive. With reviews at Kudzu.com, Yelp and Google Plus One household relocation customers in Marietta have confidence that choosing Mark the Mover for their moving and packing is a safe choice.

Marietta Georgia

As of the 2000 census, the city of Marietta had a total population of 58,748, one of metro Atlanta´s largest suburbs. Homes had been built near the Cherokee town of Kennesaw by the year 1824. In 1837 the Georgia Gazetteer said Marietta was named for the wife of US Senator and Supreme Court Judge, Thomas Willis Cobb. (Thus Cobb County) Marietta, legally recognized by the Georgia state legislature in 1834, has a square with a small courthouse. Marietta became home the Western and Atlantic Railroad. Three fires during the 1850s destroyed much of the city. The Georgia Military Institute was built in 1851. Marietta’s Oakton reidence was occupied in 1864 by Major General Lorings headquarters during the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain. In April of 1862, Union scout James Andrews came down to Marietta and spent the night in the Fletcher House hotel

Tourist attractions in Marietta include the Cobb Landmarks & Historical Society, Drexel’s Fine Arts & Collectibles, African American Sports Museum of Atlanta, Marietta Museum of History, Cobb County Youth Museum, Marietta Aeronautical Museum and Education Center, East Cobb Stables.

Marietta became home for the Bell Bomber factory during World War II. The bomber factory built 669 B-29 used by the American forces and employed 29,000 men and women at its peak shortly before the end of the war. Lockheed Corporation in 1951 took over operations after being abandoned by Bell. Now known as Lockheed-Martin, it is one of the major employers in the county and state.

Marietta was chartered by recognition of the Georgia state assembly on December 19, 1834. Thus in 2009 Marietta was 175 years old! Named for Mary Cobb who was known by her friends as ‘Marietta’, she was an active Georgian and wife of U.S. Supreme Court Judge Thomas Cobb. Early growth was fueled by the railroads and Marietta became the home base for the Western and Atlantic Railroad. Between Atlanta and Kennesaw Georgia, the civil war found Marietta near the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain in 1864.

Marietta was designed with a cute little square and retains the pedestrian meeting place as a center of activities. Now more often called a city than a town, Marietta is the home of the Cobb County Courthouse.

Marietta was chartered by recognition of the Georgia state assembly on December 19, 1834. Thus in 2009 Marietta was 175 years old! Named for Mary Cobb who was known by her friends as ‘Marietta’, she was an active Georgian and wife of U.S. Supreme Court Judge Thomas Cobb. Early growth was fueled by the railroads and Marietta became the home base for the Western and Atlantic Railroad. Between Atlanta and Kennesaw Georgia, the civil war found Marietta near the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain in 1864

Marietta was designed with a cute little square and retains the pedestrian meeting place as a center of activities. Now more often called a city than a town, Marietta has around 68,000 residents and is the home of the Cobb County Courthouse.

The Big Chicken is a KFC restaurant in Marietta. It is a landmark referred to as the ‘Big Chicken’ due to its distinctive 60 foot high rhomboid shaped chicken facade signage. At the intersection of Cobb Parkway and Roswell Road, the Big Checken was built in the 1950’s but the signature chicken facade was not added until 1964. It was not a KFC until the 1970’s. The Big Chicken sign, over five stories tall, was designed by a Georgia Tech architecture student as a marketing gimmick by the original restaurant owners, when it was called Johnny Reb’s. KFC rebuilt the landmark after damaging winds in 1996.

Marietta Ga is also home to the Confederate Cemetery, or also known as the Marietta Confederate Cemetary. Hard feelings among Union politicians led the Confederate Cemetary to be neglected the same federal funding used to maintain the National Cemetary less than a mile away.

The Marietta National Cemetary came about with the sympathies of Marietta Unionist Innkeeper Henry Cole. Cole donated the land and proposed that the dead from the Northern and Southern Armies be buried side by side. But snots from the federal government vetoed the gesture. Still, stunning examples of the sacrifices made by Americans in the war withstand, 405 dead from Wisconsin are buried amidst a memorial of the Wisconsin State Badger in granite.

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